Life A.D.

Last week, Image Comics released book one of A.D.: After Death, a three-part sci-fi spectacular that could easily be the best comic book series released this year. This also happens to be the work of two of today’s top comic book talents, with multi-awarded Scott Snyder writing the script and the equally talented Jeff Lemire providing his signature style of art in full color. Both creators have separately done terrific work in the science fiction genre, so there was no way I was going to pass up this masterpiece.

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A.D. explores a world where the human race finally found a cure for death. The story follows Jonah Cooke, who seems just about as average as the next guy, except he has a habit of stealing things.

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It’s gotten so bad that he even stole a cow on his last day at work.

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Other than that, not much is known about the protagonist’s current situation, although the story does go back to his childhood several times. These flashback scenes are more text-heavy, allowing more room for storytelling.

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Snyder’s writing is thick with emotions, adding a lot of depth to the story.

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And as good as his prose is, you’ll equally enjoy Lemire’s art, which dominates the comic book’s future scenes.

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What makes the comic even more enjoyable is that it is presented in large format, so it is actually much bigger than your usual comic book – perfect for showcasing Lemire’s art. Overall, the first book is a solid opening issue, giving you a glimpse of what a deathless future is like, while allowing you to get to know the protagonist just enough to make you want to know more. I’m definitely looking forward to the next two issues.

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Magic and mayhem

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I recently finished A Darker Shade of Magic and A Gathering of Shadows, the first two books in V.E. Schwab’s Shades of Magic trilogy. The story follows a powerful magician named Kell, one of the last remaining Antari. He is one of only two people with the ability to travel between parallel worlds, making him the perfect liaison between the three Londons. Grey London has very little magic – so little that some of its inhabitants question its existence, while others dismiss it as mere legend. Red London is Kell’s home world, peaceful and brimming with power, ruled by the Maresh family. White London, while strewn with magic, is much more chaotic; its people are willing to kill for power, especially since controlling powerful magic means controlling the throne.

And then there’s Black London, which nobody talks about – partly because they don’t want to, partly because nobody really knows what’s left of it. Even the most powerful magicians wouldn’t risk a trip there. Not willingly, anyway.

I always believed that fantasy and adventure go hand in hand, and this series is a good example of how these two elements can come together to create a thrilling story. I find that tales of exploration and discovery are much more enjoyable with a touch of magic. Throw in a bunch of interesting (not to mention shady) characters and you have a real page-turner. And did I mention there are pirates? Yup, this series has all the right ingredients for an adventure that spans four worlds.

The first book is about 400 pages long while the second novel is just over 500 pages. But, really, as hefty as they seem, you can easily zip through both novels once you get into the story. You’ll always want to read what the characters do next, and each chapter is sure to whet your appetite for the succeeding ones.

For more about the author, check out her blog at https://veschwab.wordpress.com/.